Sing, sing, singing the blues away

Are you feeling blue? Overwhelmed? Take heart – or take up singing.

The almost magical affect music has on those suffering from dementia are well established, but what about those who care for them?

Here’s some good news: I just read about a study that showed a wonderful side-benefit to music therapy. It seems that it does more than enhance the quality of life of dementia patients – it also appears to improve the mood and emotions of caregivers.

Another surprise, according to this five-month study conducted in the UK, was that the benefit lasted well after the trial ended, measurements taken two months later showing continued improvement.

Music is the language of the soul. It appears to enter the brain differently than words alone or other noise. To gain the most benefit from musical therapy, it is important to be engaged in the music somehow, rather than just having it play in the background.

A few ways to really engage are:

Singing, humming or whistling is the best way to connect to the music. Also, the use of headphones can be helpful as well as viewing a music video. The most effective songs seem to be the tunes from a persons ‘formative years’. For my Mama, who was born in 1931, the top hits of the 1940s as well as hymns had the most impact on her. A variety of online sites such as www.youtube.com  can provide easy access to a variety of music videos.

Not sure what music is best? Try a song and watch for a positive reaction. Develop a playlist. If it turns out that the list is short, it is okay. If someone has dementia, songs can be played over and over again as long as they are helpful to the listener.

Have you noticed this to be true in your experience?

For Want of a Word

While feeding Mama her thickened juice today, I suddenly wanted to hear her voice. I wanted her to say something—anything. It has been several months since she has uttered a single word.

I even tried to ask her some easy ‘yes’ questions to try to see if she would give me one of those automatic responses. With a smile, I words-finishing-well-in-lifelooked into her eyes and asked, “Do you like your juice? Is it tasty? Would you like some more?”

She tried to answer. I could tell by the almost imperceptible movement of her lips as well as the sweet expression on her face that she really wanted to say something. She looked at me intently as I continued to ask her questions. I finally gave up and began singing to her as she finished up her juice.

I got to thinking about words. Words are great. Words hold so much power—so much potential for both good and evil. Kind words are gifts we can give each other; to our spouses, family and friends.

Proverbs 25:11 states, “The right word at the right time is like a custom-made piece of jewelry,” (The Message Bible)

On the other hand, words that are wanted, but not received are heartbreaking. I wish I had a recording of Mama’s voice from when she could talk. But though I don’t have her voice, I still have her and I give her the gift of hearing my voice as often as I am able.

Later, as I was thinking about it, the words to an old nursery rhyme floated through my head:

For want of a nail the shoe was lost.
For want of a shoe the horse was lost.
For want of a horse the rider was lost.
For want of a rider the battle was lost.
For want of a battle the kingdom was lost.
And all for the want of a horseshoe nail.

Words are like that nail. They are building blocks of both relationships and memories. They can bring joy, provide hope and offer second chances. We would all benefit from a ‘word at the right time’.

Instead of a nail, the rhyme could be rephrased:

For want of a word the joy was lost
For want of a joy the chance was lost
For want of a chance the time was lost
For want of a time the hope was lost
For want of a hope the memory was lost
All for the want of a word

With the prevalence of phones, tablets and computers we can instantly give timely and thoughtful words to anyone we know, no matter where they are in the world.

Is there someone who needs to hear your voice today?

Jingles

 

  • “I am stuck on Band-Aid brand, cause band aid’s stuck on me.”
  • “Oh, I’d love to be an Oscar Meyer wiener, that is what I’d truly like to be, cause if I were an Oscar Meyer wiener, everyone would be in love with me.”
  • “In the valley of the jolly-ho, ho, ho. Green Giant”radio-finishing-well-in-life
  • “Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.”
  • “I’d like to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony, I’d like to buy the world a Coke and keep it company. It’s the real thing.”
  • “Wouldn’t you like to be a Pepper too?”
  • “My bologna has a first name, its O-S-C-A-R, my bologna has a second name it’s M-E-Y-E-R, I love to eat it every day and if you ask me why I’d say, cause Oscar Meyer has a way with B-O-L-O-G-N-A.”

Are these jingles ringing any bells? Any get stuck in your head? That’s exactly what they were designed to do.

According to Wikipedia: A jingle is a short tune used in advertising and for other commercial uses. The jingle contains one or more hooks and meaning that explicitly promote the product being advertised, usually through the use of one or more advertising slogans.  Jingles are a form of sound branding.

Was your loved one raised on radio? Or TV? It’s likely that some of the  jingles and theme songs played regularly on radio and television shows will be more than memorable. And anything that stirs a memory is helpful to activate something wonderful and pleasant inside your person.

Some of the older radio show theme songs are: The Lone Ranger, The Green Hornet, Turn your Radio On, Yukon King, NBC News and Bill Stern Sports Newsreel.

TV show theme songs such as Mr. Ed, Rawhide, Bonanza,  The Beverly Hillbillies and, of course, the very memorable I Love Lucy show may also stir something up.

These old tunes had a profound effect on people, and with a little effort and computer time you can easily discover just  the right ones from your loved one’s earlier years. Many are free to download for you to create a play list that might just awaken a memory or two.

Here’s a few more for the road…

  • “Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh what a relief it is.”
  • Once upon a time there was an engineer. Choo Choo Charlie was his name, we hear. He had an engine and he sure had fun. He used Good & Plenty candy to make his train run.
  • See the USA in your Chevrolet, America’s asking you to call.”
  • “Halo everybody, Halo. Halo is the shampoo that glorifies your hair.”
  • There’s just one Schlitz, yeah, yeah—nothing else comes near. When you’re out of Shlitz—you’re out of beer.
  • Lets All Go to A and W. Food’s more fun at A and W. We’ll have a mug of rootbeer, or maybe 2 or3, make the perfect size from the burger family.

‘Till next time, “Happy trails to you, until we meet again.”

What jingles do you remember fondly?